Man In Mars” NASA Shares First Beautiful Photo Of Marslander Environment

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The American space agency NASA has shared a first razor sharp picture taken by the InSight after its successful landing on Mars. The device sent a blurry picture of the red planet last night, but the new recording gives a much better picture of where exactly InSight ended up and what can be seen on the landing site.

“There is a quiet beauty here,” NASA tweeted the picture last night in the name of the device. “I am looking forward to exploring my new home.” (Read more below)

The American space agency NASA has shared a first razor sharp picture taken by the InSight after its successful landing on Mars. The device sent a blurry picture of the red planet last night, but the new recording gives a much better picture of where exactly InSight ended up and what can be seen on the landing site.

“There is a quiet beauty here,” NASA tweeted the picture last night in the name of the device. “I am looking forward to exploring my new home.” (Read more below)

The InSight landed successfully on Mars last night at 8.54 pm Belgian time, after a space voyage of 482 million kilometers that lasted about seven months. The Marsverkenner will drill into the soil of Mars for the next two years to examine the inside of the planet.

The landing itself was a real thriller. About an hour before, the control center on earth sent the last instructions to the device and then it was awaiting in tension and hoping that everything went well. “It takes eight minutes for a radio signal from our Mars to arrive,” said Rob Grover, who was in charge of the landing. “We could not control the InSight in real time by means of a joystick. Everything had to be done automatically. ” (Read more below)

The device – which cost more than a billion dollars – entered the atmosphere of Mars at a speed of nearly 20,000 kilometers per hour. In less than seven minutes it had to slow down to almost zero. The bottom of the lander was crucial to protect InSight from the enormous heat that was created.

Apart from the heat shield, the angle at which the landing capsule hit the atmosphere of Mars was also important. It had to be exactly 12 degrees. Had the corner been too small, InSight would have been bounced off and thrown into space for eternity. If the angle was too large, the probe would have gone down under the friction with the air like a fireball.

Parachute

It succeeded, and about three and a half minutes after the capsule hit the Mars atmosphere, a parachute opened which further inhibited the spacecraft. A few seconds later, explosives blew away the heat shield. That was the moment that InSight was preparing for the actual landing. A few seconds later, the probe extended three legs. The device then dangled for a minute or two under the parachute. (read more below)

EPA

45 seconds before landing, InSight had to leave the capsule and his landing missiles had to take over the last brake. The boosters stopped every horizontal movement, bringing the InSight down perpendicularly. In the last 15 seconds the device still reached a speed of just 2.5 meters per second. The Marslander landed flawlessly on the red planet. (read more below)

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InSight came down in Elysium Planitia, a bare plain just above the equator of Mars. The flight control chose that spot in the hope that there were few rocks or stones that would make it difficult for the Marslander to land. And also with his mission. InSight is going to drill meters deep into the soil of Mars, so that scientists can find out what is under the surface and gain insight into the history of the red planet. That drilling is easier on a surface that is level. Because there are no shadows, the solar panels of the lander can also generate more energy at that location. (read more below)

The first image of Mars that sent the InSight.

Photo News The first image of Mars that sent the InSight.

The Royal Observatory of Belgium is participating in the project. Bart van Hove, researcher at the KSB, is pleased with the successful landing. “It was a great moment. We watched the landing together at the observatory with about 20 people. ”

Marbevingen

The KBS will analyze the data from the American radio instrument RISE (Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment) to form an image of the internal structure of the planet. Professor Véronique Dehant is responsible at the Observatory for processing the data from RISE. She is also part of the SEIS team of the French space agency CNES. This will be detected and recorded with a seismometer ‘Mars’. (read more below)

REUTERS

The suspicion is that these quakes are there, only different than on Earth. Mars does not have tectonic plates like our planet, but researchers think they can observe dozens or hundreds of quakes in the coming years. These vibrations can also tell something about the interior of Mars.

Today the work of the InSight starts immediately. InSight has already opened its solar panels last night and reported this to the control center. The orbiter Mars Odyssey transmitted the signals to the earth, where they arrived around 2.30 pm Belgian time. Thanks to the solar panels, the robot can recharge its batteries every day, according to NASA.

Solar panels

The two solar panels of the spacecraft are each 2.2 meters wide. Although Mars gets less sunlight than the earth, because of the distance to the sun, the robot does not need much to be able to work, according to NASA. In a broad daylight, the panels deliver 600 to 700 watts, which should be more than enough to make the instruments of the robot work. When the panels are covered with dust, which can often occur on Mars, the panels would still deliver 200 to 300 watts.

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